Statewatch article: RefNo# 27170
Europol-USA agreement: Was it really needed?
Statewatch Bulletin; vol 16 no 2 March-April 2006
- no record of data transfers recorded by USA
- 2005 evaluation report still secret

In the aftermath of 11 September 2001 an agreement between the USA and Europol for the exchange of information and intelligence was rushed through by 6 December 2001. This was supplemented by a further agreement on 20 December 2002 to allow the exchange of personal data.

At the time of the adoption of these two agreements great concern was expressed: i) that the USA did not (and still does not) have a data protection law covering non-US citizens and ii) that the USA was unable to provide a list of all the agencies who could request or have access to data provided by Europol (said to be around 1,500 agencies at federal, state and local level).

The supplementary agreement of December 2002 said that a "joint evaluation" should be carried out within two years. The Management Board of Europol produced a "mutual evaluation" report on 13 July 2005, which was sent to the Council's Article 36 Committee (high-level interior ministry officials). However, this report still remains secret (EU doc no: 11502/05). The question is why?

Europol set up an office in Washington DC, USA in August 2002, to transmit requests from Europol and EU member states. The picture is complicated by the fact that seven EU member states have their own seconded officers based in the USA - Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and the UK. Moreover, the USA has a network of attaches of US federal authorities based in EU member states.

In practice what is happening is that responses to requests from Europol in Washington go either to back to it or "directly to EU Member States with copies to the liaison officers". But requests from the USA's multitude of agencies are made through individual EU member states by established channels.

The Europol US Liaison Office sent requests covering 509 cases to US agencies and 266 case requests were sent to the Europol office by US agencies (these appear to concern requests for Europol itself particularly access to its Analysis Work Files, AWFs). But:

From the US perspective Europol remains to be of limited immediate value if its core function is to provide for making requests to the USA on behalf of MS. The USA anticipated that Europol would provide EU wide analytical assessments about crime as well as information on particular transnational cases impacting on the USA

In reality:

operational information and law enforcement intelligence requests from US authorities reach EU MS [Member States] directly through long established bilateral channels

this is because:

US law enforcement agencies have well established liaison relationships with most if not all the EU MS.

and:

the actual added value gained by US law enforcement authorities through the application of the cooperation agreements between Europol and the USA is deemed to be limited (emphasis added)

and:

there appears to be uncertainty and even distrust concerning the information/law enforcement intelligence process applied by Europol among the law enforcement community in the US.

This "distrust" extends to information/intelligence concerning terrorism where Europol is viewed as a "police" agency (which it is) rather than a security agency (which it is not):

Original efforts following the tragedy of the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 in the USA aimed at enhancing cooperation between Europol and the FBI in the context of the Counter Terrorism Task Force (CTTF) at Europol were unsuccessful as MS - according to the assessment of the USA - were unwilling to share information with the USA via the Europol channel... Eventually, the FBI withdrew the liaison post it had assigned to the CTTF at Europol after three months.

Equally damning are the admissions that while Europol is able to provide figures of the number of "correspondences" (2,582 in 2004) wh

Statewatch ISSN 1756-851X. Personal usage as private individuals/"fair dealing" is allowed. We also welcome links to material on our site. Usage by those working for organisations is allowed only if the organisation holds an appropriate licence from the relevant reprographic rights organisation (eg: Copyright Licensing Agency in the UK) with such usage being subject to the terms and conditions oof that licence and to local copyright law. Statewatch is not responsible for the content of external websites and inclusion of a link does not constitute an endorsement.


Click here to return to your search results
For a print friendly version click here
To start a new search, click here
To return to the Statewatch home page click here
Statewatch, PO Box 1516, London N16 0EW, UK. Tel: + 44 (0)207 697 4266 Fax: + 44 (0)208 880 1727 email office@statewatch.org